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WifiSitter Troubleshooting

Adapter Whitelisting


Taken from the README.md (Program Files\WifiSitter\README.md)
Configuration
There isn't much to configure in WifiSitter but there is one tunable to configure, there may be some network adapters you want ignored complete, Microsoft WiFi Direct for example. Network adapters are named "Ethernet" or "WiFi", names are too generic so the whitelist is made up of the network adapter descriptions. They are string values located at:
HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\WifiSitter\NicWhiteList

Introducing Wifi Sitter

The following is simply a copy of the README.md from my latest project found here, I hope you find it useful.

Strange F# Error on Mono/Xamarin

While dipping my toes into F# some time ago, I ran into a compile-time error that I couldn't explain or find a solution for: "Error FS0010: Unexpected keyword 'open' in implementation file (FS0010)". I was just building the Hello World app that comes with MonoDevelop out of the box. After some tooling around on StackOverflow and coming up short, the only thing I could think was, "Maybe it's a Mono bug, it's not in their issue tracker so I should just compile everything from source to be sure." Long story short, that was not the problem so don't waste your time; Mono 3.10+ is more than adequate. The issue was because I had a hyphen in my project name and the AssemblyInfo.fs file was improperly formatted because of it.

.Net is Open Source. Why do I care?

If you're a .Net developer and an Open Source enthusiast, these past couple of weeks have been really exciting for you. .Net CLR and core libraries have been relicensed under the MIT license, and they've announced a forthcoming .Net CoreRT that will be truly cross platform: Windows, Linux, OSX. All these projects have been moved under the .Net Foundation with a patent promise and code hosted on Github. This is real Open Source, not just an Open Source component that you can only run on a closed platform; you can run commercially supported .Net on a fully open stack. That is awesome!

I'm a Linux guy and I use .Net

Why would any self respecting Linux enthusiast use .Net for anything? The short answer can be summed up in one word: Mono.